The Audemars Piguet foundation takes time to re-green the globe
November 8, 2010 Stories

The Audemars Piguet Foundation takes time to re-green the globe

Promoting reforestation and environmental education: The Audemars Piguet Foundation uses part of the proceeds from watch sales to help renew the Earth’s forests.

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From the trees of New York’s Botanical Garden to Portugal’s Tapada de Mafra Reserve and the Allanblakia plantations in Ghana, the Audemars Piguet Foundation is sowing its seeds. Created in 1992 on the Royal Oak’s anniversary, the Foundation devotes its energy to the cause of reforestation. For the last eight years, it has spearheaded worldwide environmental education for children.

Initially, most project suggestions came from the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), thus assuring top standards of quality. Today, Foundation Secretary General Daniel Saugy is flooded with proposals from many sources. "Two to three project ideas land on my desk every week," he says. "Those that don‘t fit into our program are eliminated. Then, Jasmine Audemars, the Foundation’s President, gives her opinion. The projects thus pre-selected go to an IUCN expert, who is also a member of the Foundation’s board. The best proposals then go before the board."

Four to five projects are started every year, "with very good on-site results," according to Saugy. "The fact that our headquarters are in Switzerland reinforces the credibility of many of these projects. Even ten years after providing initial support, we are still receiving regular news about the projects."

The Foundation’s newest ventures include the restoration of 500 hectares of woodland at 17 locations in Scotland, the training of biodiversity guards in Ecuador, the revitalization of mangroves in Senegal, and tree-planting and support for practical environmental education in Jaipur District, India.

The Foundation’s annual budget depends on Audemars Piguet’s watch sales. "We get a fixed amount for every watch," Saugy explains, without providing any more detail. In the end, the important thing is that the world really gets greener.